Allegory Of The Cave Paragraph

Allegory Of The Cave Paragraph

In the Allegory of the Cave, Plato defines education and ignorance as a part of human nature, and establishes that unless man makes Judgments based on varied perspectives through an open mind, he will never be able to advance in knowledge. Through a parable he tells his student Glaucoma, Plato illustrates that one has to seek wisdom with a perceptive attitude, while also interpreting the opposing side’s argument.

By doing this, man can ultimately accomplish enlightenment. Plato emphasizes that in order to identify with all types of people man must go “down to the habitation of the others, and accustom [themselves]… For then [they] will see a thousand times better than those who live there”. He explains that even if one feels that they are truly educated in the ways of life, they should still attempt to understand the other point of views in order to distinguish true reality and comprehend its Justifications.

Plato acknowledges that it is human nature to be imprisoned by our own perspectives and ignorant to others, but the fact is, everyone has their own realities, and until you accept their existence and examine them, you will never be able to fully validate and advance the reality that is your own.