Antigone: Text and Context

Antigone: Text and Context

The year the Antigone was first produced
c. 442 BCE
Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone together constitute the cycle commonly known as:
the Theban plays.
In terms of the chronology of the story’s events, Antigone is the (first, second, or third) of the three Theban plays.
third
In terms of the order in which they were written, Antigone is the (first, second, or third) of the three Theban plays.
first
A king of Thebes and the father of Oedipus
Laius
Before the birth of Oedipus, the Oracle at Delphi foretells that the son of Laius will . . .
kill his father.
The literal meaning of “Oedipus”
“swollen foot”
When as a young man Oedipus himself travels to Delphi, the Oracle foretells that he will
kill his father and marry his mother.
After he defeats this creature, Oedipus is made king of Thebes.
the Sphinx
The wife (and mother) of Oedipus
Jocasta
When he discovers the truth, that he himself is contamination within Thebes, Oedipus . . .
When he discovers the truth, that he himself is contamination within Thebes, Oedipus . . .
blinds himself with the brooches he pulls from the dress of Jocasta.
Who accompanies Oedipus in exile?
Who accompanies Oedipus in exile?
Antigone and Ismene
The literal meaning of the Latin phrase
The literal meaning of the Latin phrase “deus ex machina”
“God from the machine” — yes, even in “Dodgeball.”
What animal goes on four legs in the morning, two legs at noon, and three legs in the evening?
What animal goes on four legs in the morning, two legs at noon, and three legs in the evening?
According to the Sphinx and, to the great chagrin of the former, Oedipus, man.
The literal meaning of the word
The literal meaning of the word “tragedy”
“goat song” (“Stahahahahnd, ba-aaack, stahahahahnd, ba-aaack!”)
An essential and perhaps the most important difference between the theater of ancient Greece and the theater of the modern era:
The theater of ancient Greece was radically sacred, and the modern theater is radically secular.
sacred
religious in nature, association, or use; not secular or profane
secular
of or relating to the worldly or temporal as distinguished from the spiritual or eternal; not sacred; not overtly or specifically religious
radical
of or relating to the root or origin : original, fundamental, inherent
The three great luminaries of classical Greek drama
Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides (You should learn to spell their names!)
One of the theatrical innovations of Sophocles, this pertaining to actors
Sophocles added a third actor to the cast.
One of the great theatrical innovations of Sophocles, this pertaining to character and tragedy as a genre
One of the great theatrical innovations of Sophocles, this pertaining to character and tragedy as a genre
The Sophoclean tragic hero, whose actions are driven by dedication to a moral principle
The rules of decorum in classical theater prohibited the dramatization of _______ on stage.
violence
A) Classical dramatists observed the classical unities, (Aristotelian unities, or three unities). Identify and explain each of the three classical unities.
Unity of time: the action of the play transpires in a single day.
B) Classical dramatists observed the classical unities, (Aristotelian unities, or three unities). Identify and explain each of the three classical unities.
Unity of place: the play covers a single physical space and does not attempt to compress geography, nor does the stage represent more than one place.
C) Classical dramatists observed the classical unities, (Aristotelian unities, or three unities). Identify and explain each of the three classical unities.
Unity of action: a play has one main action that it follows, with nothing that could constitute digression or distraction from that main action.
The festivals at which classical dramas were convened as part of the worship of which of the Greek gods?
The festivals at which classical dramas were convened as part of the worship of which of the Greek gods?
Dionysus
A (tragic) error or miscalculation
hamartia
Although the meaning Aristotle intended when he included this word in his Poetics remains the subject of controversy and debate, scholars have defined it as the purgation (or cleansing) of pity and fear.
catharsis
In which of the Greek city-states were the works of Sophocles first performed?
Athens