Antigone vs. Medea

Antigone vs. Medea

World literature Antigone vs. Medea Whether it be Medea who kills her sons, Antigone who buries her brother, both female characters hold a common goal of seeking either revenge or avenge as well as rebel against authority in the name of her beliefs. However, the female roles in both plays are associated with death. Furthermore, their twisted family history also seem to contribute to the result of each tragedy. Both main characters are characterized as bold, stubborn, outspoken females with extreme, impulsive tendencies.

Both stories share the lives of strong, sometimes manipulative characters but their actions are different depending on their moral views and setting. Medea is usually very demanding about getting what she wants when she wants it. Antigone will do anything she needs to do in order to accomplish her goal, no matter if it requires breaking the law or hurting people she loves. Antigone •Antigone is the greatest heroine •Antigone is one of few women who openly rebelled against her fixed position in life •Admitting her involvement in the “crime”. Refusing to allow her sister to share the blame. •Reacting to her death sentence without anguish or desperation, but with indifference. •Choosing to take her death into her own hands. Instead of rotting away in a cave, as was her punishment, she chose to hang herself from the ceiling of the cave. She defied the view of women in her society. It wasn’t her crime that repulsed her people, it was her gender. “The people approve of what she did, but they do not approve of the fact that she did it” Medea Perhaps the most fascinating and complex character in Greek drama.

She is the ultimate combination of heroine, villain and victim, all displayed in a single play. Medea was married to a Greek named Jason, whom she followed from her foreign land, to Greece. Her love for Jason was deep, and when he elected to leave her to marry the daughter of Creon, Medea was furious. She killed his bride, using the cleverest chess piece available, Jason’s own children. While she loved her children, her hatred for Jason was greater than a mother’s love could ever have been. These acts of murder were the ultimate revenge toward her x-husband, leaving him brideless and childless. She gave up all she loved for Jason: •Murdering her brother and betraying her family •Leaving her home for a foreign land [Greece] that would not accept her •Becoming a mother, when she had no desire to bear children. “I would rather fight three battles than bear one child” Medea accompanies Antigone as one of the defining heroines of ancient Greek drama. She defied her role as the “happy”, helpless housewife and refused to accept her betrayal without striking back.