Persepolis Paragraph

Persepolis Paragraph

?Green: context. Yellow: remember to include the author in your argument since you’re arguing what she is doing. Blue: analysis of picture that goes beyond summary. Pink: explanation. Through her textual and visual evidence, Satrapi highlights how Marji’s informal education helps her see the inequalities that exist within the social classes in Iran. The books she reads educate her so that she wants to fight the Shah’s regime and help the people in Iran gain some type of power. At home, Marji’s parents give her many books about people in other ountries that in the past have tried to rebel against their own government. Satrapi includes a panel where Marji is sitting surrounded by piles of books and reading numerous stories. In the panel the books tower over her, reinforcing the idea that there is a wealth of information in these texts—information that extends beyond the information she is receiving at school. Satrapi pictures Marji with a small smile on her face, helping to underscore the idea that Marji is enjoying this form of education.

From these books, Marji learns “everything about the children of Palestine. About Fidel Castro. About the young Vietnamese killed by the Americans. About the revolutionaries of my country…” (12). Through her captions, Satrapi reveals how the types of information in these books focus young Marji on the plight of the social classes in other countries, inspiring her to do something about this same situation in her own country. The effect of Marji’s education from these books is seen when she communicates with God.